These notes are for the original Nexus 7 (2012) wifi version and Android 4.3 (Build JWR66V)

I used these notes and Windows 8.1 and it worked as expected. Should work for Windows 7 or 8. And most likely subsequent versions of Android as well.

No doubt, there are lots of other ‘how to root’ articles on the web. I wrote this one because, for the past year since I got my Nexus 7, I’ve had it rooted but I used a toolkit. That is nice and handy but I really wanted to understand what was going on behind the scenes. Plus, if I ever reinstall Windows I want to remeber how I had it all set up. Really, the trickiest part is getting the Nexus 7 connected to your computer correctly.

If you need more hand holding, the toolkit I used in the past was WugFresh’s Nexus Root Toolkit. Even though he does an excellent job, my notes here may help you get your devices connected.

Here be Dragons: This isn’t hard but you need to proceed step by step. Best to be done before you have any data on your device. If you have data, look for a tutorial on backing up that data. I’m not responsible if your brick your device.

Ready? Here we go! Start with your Nexus 7 not connected.

Download necessary software

Just download and unzip where noted. Notes on installing are later.

  • Download and unzip USBDeview
  • Donwload the Java JDK
    • Note: I used the 32bit version even though I have 64bit Windows.
  • Download Android SDK
    • Note: Scroll down and click ‘Other Platforms’. Download the android-sdk_r22.0.4-windows.zip
  • Download SuperSU
    • Note: This is an XDA forum post. Scroll down to where it says download.
  • Download the CWM recovery
    • Look for Google Nexus 7 then get the recovery image from the 3rd column

Prepare Your Nexus 7

  • Go to Settings – About Tablet
  • Tap on Build Number 7 times to enable Developer Options
  • Go back to Settings and then into Developer Options
  • Check (enable) USB Debugging
  • Plug your Nexus 7 into your computer with USB debugging enabled

Adjusting the Settings in Windows

  • With your N7 still plugged in, launch Device Manager
  • Identify whatever looks like your Nexus 7 and right click it
    • Note: look around, there is a chance it is listed under Android Phone if you have made attempts to do this before
    • Select Uninstall
    • Check Delete the driver software for thsi device
    • Click OK

Clear USB devices

  • Detach your Nexus 7 from your computer
  • Go to where you unzipped USBDeview
  • Right-click on USBDeview and Run As Administrator
  • In USBDeview, look for anything that says Google or Nexus 7 or Android and right-click on it then click “Uninstall Selected Devices” on anything that says Google or Nexus 7 or Android
    • Note: Pay attention to the VendorID column and be sure you unistall anything from VendorID “18d1″ or “04e8″
  • Reboot your computer

Install USB Driver

  • With Nexus 7 unplugged, install the drivers you downloaded at to top of this tutorial

Install the Java JDK

  • Install the JDK you downloaded above

Install Android SDK

  • Unzip the Android SDK
  • Run SDK Manager.exe
    • If this doesn’t seem to run, be sure you have the 32bit version of the JDK installed
  • Only select two packages:
    • Check Android SDK Platform-tools and Google USB Driver options
    • Uncheck everything else
  • Click Install Packages button
  • Select Accept All and click the “Install” button.
  • Wait till the downloading finishes.

Setting up the drivers

  • Open up your Windows Device Manager
  • Plug your Nexus 7, with USB Debugging mode still activated, into your computer
  • Right-click on the entry for the Nexus 7 in Device Manager
  • Click ‘Update Driver Software’
  • Click the second option, ‘Browse my computer for software’
  • Click the second option, ‘Let me pick from a list’
  • Click Show all Devices
  • Click Next
  • Click Have Disk
  • Navigate to where you unzipped the SDK files and go to \android-sdk-windows\extras\google\usb_driver
  • Choose android_winusb.inf and click Open
  • Click OK
  • Select Android ADB Interface and click Next
    • Note: On Windows 8 I had to deselect ‘Show Compatible Hardware’ for Android ADB Interface to show up
  • Click Yes to the warning message.
  • If you see a message about installing Google software, check ‘Always Trust’ and click Install

Verify installation

  • Go to android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Hold Shift key down and right-click anywhere in the folder and select Open command prompt here.
  • In the command prompt window, type “adb devices” (without quotes)
  • You should see a long string and the word ‘device’ listed. This indicates everything is working
    • Note: If you see ‘unauthorized’ instead of ‘device’ do this:
      • Detach your Nexus 7
      • Disable USB Debugging and keep the Developer Options screen open
      • Connect your Nexus 7
      • You may see something about drivers installing. Don’t worry.
      • Enable USB Debugging
      • run the ‘adb devices’ command again
      • Watch your Nexus 7 screen for a question about authorizing this computer
      • Agree to the authorization
      • Run the ‘adb devices’ command again and the result should now list ‘device”

Install ADB Bootloader Driver

  • Disconnect the Nexus 7
  • Power off the Nexus 7
  • Restart in fast boot mode by keeping the Volume Down and Power buttons pressed simultaneously
  • Connect the Nexus 7 to the computer now and wait till your PC installs all the drivers it could.
  • Open the Windows Device Manager and you should see Android listed under Other Devices
  • Right click on the Android entry and click Update Driver
  • Click ‘Update Driver Software’
  • Click the second option, ‘Browse my computer for software’
  • Click the second option, ‘Let me pick from a list’
  • Click Show all Devices
  • Click Next
  • Click Have Disk
  • Navigate to where you unzipped the SDK files and go to \android-sdk-windows\extras\google\usb_driver
  • Choose android_winusb.inf and click Open
  • Click OK
  • Select Android Bootloader Interface and click Next
    • Note: On Windows 8 I had to deselect ‘Show Compatible Hardware’ for Android Bootloader Interface to show up
  • Click Yes to the warning message.
  • If you see a message about installing Google software, check ‘Always Trust’ and click Install

Verify fastboot installation

  • Go to android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Hold Shift key down and right-click anywhere in the folder and select Open command prompt here.
  • In the command prompt window, type “Fastboot devices” (without quotes)
  • You should see a long string and the word ‘fastboot’ listed. This indicates everything is working
  • A Note about Windows 8.1:
    • I had a problem getting fastboot to see my Nexus 7. If you have this issue too, gie this a try:
    • We have to disable the default Driver Signing enforcement which Microsoft has inbuilt into Windows 8 and 8.1. To do so You have to do the following
      • Press Windows Key + R (or go to Run)
      • Type “shutdown.exe /r /o /f /t 00″
      • Go to Troubleshoot –> Advanced options –> Start Up Settings –> Restart
      • After a computer soft reboot, hit Option 7 (Disable driver signature enforcement)
      • Restart your PC

Unlock your Nexus 7

  • If your Nexus 7 is unlocked (On the first Google screen when you power on the device, the lock icon loooks unlocked) you can skip this step.
  • If you haven’t unlocked the tablet before you need to now. This Will Wipe your device so be ready for that. If you have anything precious, have a backup. You have been warned.
  • It has been my experience that my tablet stayed unlocked ever after a Factory Data Reset
  • With your Nexus 7 disconnected from your computer, Power off the Nexus 7
  • Power the Nexus 7 back on
  • Be sure debugging mode is enabled and then connect the Nexus 7 to your PC
  • Go to android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Hold Shift key down and right-click anywhere in the folder and select Open command prompt here.
  • In the command prompt window, type “adb reboot bootloader” (without quotes)
  • The Nexus 7 will reboot
  • In the command prompt window, type “fastboot oem unlock” (no quotes)
    • Note: You will have to accept and erase all the user data on the tablet
  • If you had to unlock, return here after your Nexus 7 is back up and restored

Copy the SuperSU zip to the Nexus 7

  • Be sure USB Debugging mode is enabled and attach our Nexus 7 to your computer
  • Copy the SuperSU zip file you downloaded above into android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Go to android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Hold Shift key down and right-click anywhere in the folder and select Open command prompt here.
  • In the command prompt window, type “adb push your-SuperSU.zip /sdcard/” (without quotes)
    • Note: you need to put in your actual zip file name so it could be something like:
      • adb push UPDATE-SuperSU-v1.43.zip /sdcard/

Backup your Nexus 7

DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP!  You have been warned.

We are going to boot the Nexus 7 into Recovery with out permanently flashing the new recovery. This allows you to do a back up.

  • Copy the Recovery Image you downloaded above into android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Disconnect the Nexus 7
  • Power off the Nexus 7
  • Restart in fast boot mode by keeping the Volume Down and Power buttons pressed simultaneously
  • Connect the Nexus 7 to your PC
  • Go to android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Hold Shift key down and right-click anywhere in the folder and select Open command prompt here.
    • To double check if things are connected correctly, type “Fastboot devices” (without quotes)
    • You should see a long string and the word ‘fastboot’ listed. This indicates everything is working
  • At the command line, type “fastboot boot recovery.img” (no quotes)
    • Note: ‘recovery.img’ should be the complete name of the recovery image that you downloaded above
  • Your Nexus 7 will boot into Recovery
  • On the Nexus 7, click the down volume button to move the cursor down to backup and restore
  • Press the power button to select
  • Press the power button again to select Backup
  • This could take a while depending on how much data, apps, etc. you have on the device. It will say Backup Complete at the bottom of the screen when it is done.
  • Press the volume key to move down to Go Back
  • Press the power button on Reboot the System

Flash the Recovery Image

  • Power off the Nexus 7
  • Restart in fast boot mode by keeping the Volume Down and Power buttons pressed simultaneously
  • Connect the Nexus 7 to your PC
  • Go to android-sdk-windows\platform-tools
  • Hold Shift key down and right-click anywhere in the folder and select Open command prompt here.
    • To double check if things are connected correctly, type “Fastboot devices” (without quotes)
    • You should see a long string and the word ‘fastboot’ listed. This indicates everything is working
  • At the command line, type “fastboot flash recovery recovery.img” (no quotes)
    • Note: ‘recovery.img’ should be the complete name of the recovery image that you downloaded above
  • You’ll see sending ‘recovery’ OKAY and writing ‘recovery’ OKAY
  • On the Nexus 7, press the volume down button until you get to ‘Recovery Mode’ then press the power button
  • Once recovery mode starts up, use the volume key to move down to ‘Install Zip’ then press the power button
  • On ‘Choose Zip From SDCARD’ press the power button
  • On ‘0/’ press the power button
  • Use the volume button to move down to the zip file you copied earlier and press the power button
  • Move down to Yes – Install SU zip file and press the power button and installation will begin
  • Use the volume keys to scroll down to ‘Go back’ and the power button to select until you get to the first screen
  • On ‘reboot system now’ press the power button
  • Press the power button again and the Nexus 7 should reboot
  • You should now see the SuperSU app listed
  • You can verify root by downloading and running Root Checker from Google Play
    • When you run it, SuperSU will ask you to grant permissions. Click Grant.
    • You should see the Congratulations! message

Install Busy Box

  • Get the Busy Box Installer from the Google Play Store
    • Busybox adds functionality to your device that it does not have without it. Many programs require busybox to work correctly.
  • Be sure you are connected to your wireless because some things will download in the next steps
  • Tap on the icon once it is downloaded and appears on your homescreen
  • Grant premissions at the SuperSU prompt
  • Close the popup
  • Once everything downloads, click Install
  • On the next screen, I chose Normal Install
  • You’ll see a Congratulations! pop-up when everything is done
  • Close the pop-up and close the Busy Box installer

Enjoy your rooted Nexus 7!

 
You can go to Google (or even just use your address bar if Google is your default search engine) and search for: 
set timer 10 seconds
And you'll have a handy countdown timer with an alarm. Use hours or minutes. You could even "set timer for 23 hours 59 minutes" and have an alarm for tomorrow at this time.

#googlerocks  

Google

Illegal to track people but devices, like SIM cards, is OK. Looks like they are just trying to get you your lost phone back.

Moscow Subway To Use Devices To Read Data On Phones
Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty broadcasts in 28 languages. Most of our programs are available on FM and medium-wave frequencies of local radio stations in the countries of our broadcast area.

 
Scientists believe they may have found a new planet in the far reaches of the solar system, up to four times the mass of Jupiter.Its orbit would be thousands of times further from the Sun than the Earth's – which could explain why it has so far remained undiscovered.

Largest planet in the solar system could be about to be discovered – and it’s up to four times the size of Jupiter
Tyche’s orbit would be thousands of times further from the Sun than the Earth’s – which could explain why it has so far remained undiscovered.

 
This program lets you close all running applications with just a single click. Just create a shortcut to the tool in the Start Menu, Quick Launch, Windows 7 Taskbar or elsewhere.
Why would you need this? Well, I frequently have lots of Windows Explorer windows open at work because I need files from various places on my desktop and the network. This gives me a nice way to close all of these windows with one click. I then open my 5 everyday folders with a single keystroke using AutoHotKey…but that's a topic for another post.
The nice part is that you can also add a string to the short cut to keep some windows open. So for example, maybe you want to shut down all of your explorer windows but not Chrome and not Outlook. Simple, just add -x="outlook.exe|chrome.exe" to the shortcut. 
LIght weight, no system resources used. No install necessary. Unzip it and have a look through the readme file for details.

Close All Open Windows with a Single Click – NTWind Software
Close All Open Windows with a Single Click. This program lets you close all running applications with just a single click. It doesn’t use system resources because it only flashes a ‘close’ signal to all open applications on the desktop and then ceases. Just create a shortcut to the tool in the …

By: University of Pennsylvania
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntlI-pDUxPE

RHex is an all-terrain walking robot that could one day climb over rubble in a rescue mission or cross the desert with environmental sensors strapped to its back.

Pronounced “Rex,” like the over-excited puppy it resembles when it is bounding over the ground, RHex is short for “robot hexapod,” a name that stems from its six springy legs.

Legs have an advantage over wheels when it comes to rough terrain, but the articulated legs often found on walking robots require complex, specialized instructions for each moving part. To get the most mobility out of RHex’s simple, one-jointed legs, Penn researchers are essentially teaching the robot Parkour. Taking inspiration from human free-runners, the team is showing the robot how to manipulate its body in creative ways to get around all sorts of obstacles.

The RHex platform was first developed through a multi-university collaboration more than a decade ago. Graduate student Aaron Johnson and professor Daniel Koditschek, both of the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, are working on a version of RHex known as XRL, or X-RHex Lite. This lighter and more agile version of the robot, developed in Koditschek’s Kod*Lab, a division of Engineering’s General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab, is ideal for testing new ways for it to run, jump, and climb.

By activating its legs in different sequences, XRL can execute double jumps, flips, and, through a combination of moves, even pull-ups. For the tallest obstacles, the robot can launch itself vertically, hook its front legs on the edge of the object it’s trying to surmount, then drag its body up and over. The researchers fully demonstrated this particular maneuver under more controlled conditions in the lab.

The paper where Johnson and Koditschek outlined these capabilities—”Toward a Vocabulary of Legged Leaping”—was selected as a finalist for best student paper at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation in May.

“What we want is a robot that can go anywhere, even over terrain that might be broken and uneven,” Johnson says. “These latest jumps greatly expand the range of what this machine is capable of, as it can now jump onto or across obstacles that are bigger than it is.”

For more info: http://www.upenn.edu/spotlights/robot-jumps-flips-and-does-pull-ups
The scientific paper from the lab: http://kodlab.seas.upenn.edu/Aaron/ICRA2013

Text by Evan Lerner
Video by Kurtis Sensenig
Music: “Stretched Out” by Hedgehog’s Dilemma